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Terry VanderWert

Review of Mark Allen’s Strength Training for Triathletes

Review of Mark Allen’s Strength Training for Triathletes

(updated August 13, 2019)

After competing in sprint triathlons for eight years, my training had become sloppy.  I had lost the discipline of the early years.  I had nearly stopped strength training, focusing instead on cardio and endurance training.  And to top it off, my performance was poorer.  I was slower than ever and struggling with knee pain while running.

 

Credible References for Strength Training

So, the article entitled “Mark Allen’s 12 Best Strength Exercises” jumped out at me as I skimmed my emails on a recent winter morning.    Having read about triathlon for over eight years, I knew of Mark Allen and considered him a credible source of information.

I became even more interested in the plan once I realized that this strength training plan had also been a turning point for Mark.  In the first full season after following this strength training program, Mark won the three international multi-sport endurance events, including IRONMAN World Championship in Kona-Kailua, Hawaii.

Around the same time, I read about Judy Cole, a 73-year-old ultra runner.   Judy had started running every day during her early 30s.  However, early on, she had problems with her knees.  Following the advice of her running partner to strengthen her quads and hamstringsbecame a game changer”.

Judy’s experience sounded oh-so-familiar , so I committed to Mark’s plan.

 

My Initial Experience with Mark Allen’s Strength Training Program

This post is a journal of my experience with Mark Allen’s strength training program. 

I first published this post after completing four sessions of the first, or adaptation, phase.  I eventually finished eight sessions.

Now in the second, or endurance, phase, I am continuing to feel stronger.   Exercises that were especially difficult in the first sessions are now easier.  And, for the first time in months, I am running without knee pain.

 

Mark’s Best Strength Training Exercises

The table below lists the twelve exercises in this program.  The table also shows the triathlon event(s) most impacted by the exercise.  The original article includes videos that show how to perform each of them correctly.

Exercise Helps most with . . .
Lateral Pull-Downs Swim
Leg Extensions Run
Leg Curls Bike, Run
Bench Press Swim
Squats Bike, Run
Lateral Dumbbell Raise Swim
Calf Raises Run
Dumb-bell Pullover Swim
Backward Lunges Run
Bicep Curls Swim, Bike
Tricep Extensions Swim
Leg Press Bike, Run

 

 

Strength Training Restarted – Warmup and Cooldown

I start each session, no matter the Phase, with core exercises and 10 minutes of cardio to warm up.  In August 2019, I made some changes to the core exercise routine based on the recommendation of Tri Swim Coach.

The latest core exercise portion includes one minute each of:

  • Plank — one minute.
  • Side plank — one minute on each side.
  • Bridge – one minute.
  • Abs — one minute of bicycle crunches – go to 3:00 in the Tri Swim Coach video.  (Before August, I did a static crunch sitting up on the floor with the back at about 45 degrees off the floor and legs extended and on the floor.  This is an alternative to crunches that have recently fallen out of favor with trainers.)

Before starting with the weights, I spend 10 minutes to finish warming up.  This involves walking, jogging on an elliptical machine, or riding a stationary bike at an intensity high enough to break a sweat.

Throughout the journey, I have recorded the number of repetitions and weights for each of the exercises of each session in a Google Sheet.  I have also noted when I could use a heavier weight in the next session and any pain or soreness I felt during or after the session.

After each session, I complete another 10-15 minutes of cardio.  I then complete a sequence of static stretches of my hamstrings, quads, calves, and upper and lower back.

Progress is coming – slowly but surely.  I have increased weights while doubling the number of repetitions.  The amount of soreness in the days after the session has been much less.  And, I have started to run again.

Periodically, I re-read the original article and watch the videos to make certain I perform each exercise using the correct form and breathing.

Leg exension exercise machine

Machine used for the leg extension exercise. Mark Allen’s program involves a mix of exercises that use free weights, weight machines, dumbbells, and body weight.

 

Endurance Strength Training – Phase 2

The main difference between the first two phases is that Phase 2 involves two sets of 12 to 15 repetitions (“reps”) of each of the exercises with 90 seconds rest between sets, rather than one set in Phase 1.  As in Phase 1, I completed two sessions per week with at least one day, but usually three days, between them.

During Phase 1, I selected weights for each of the exercises for which I could complete 15 repetitions with good form.  For some of these, I was able to increase the weight slightly during the four weeks.

In transitioning into Phase 2,  I used the same weights as at the end of Phase 1.   However, in the first two sessions, I completed only 12 (rather than 15) repetitions in each of the two sets (except for the squats for which I completed 15 repetitions).   I did this following the principle of injury prevention that calls for increasing intensity gradually.   

Increasing the intensity, time, or type of activity too quickly is one common reason for a sports injury. To prevent this, many fitness experts recommend that both novice and expert athletes follow the ten percent rule, which sets a limit on increases in weekly training. This guideline simply states that you should increase your activity no more than 10 percent per week. That includes distance, intensity, weight lifted, and length of your exercise session.”  Source: Very Well Fit

Continuing with this principle, I increased the number of repetitions to 15 for the first of two sets in week 2; the second set still involved 12 repetitions.  In week 3 and beyond of Phase 2, I completed 15 repetitions for both sets. 

 

Restarting to Run

Also, early in Phase 2, I ran indoors on the LifeTime Fitness track for 10 or more minutes after weight lifting and before stretching.  Another pleasant surprise has been the absence of knee pain during the run.  This seems to confirm the theory that my knee pain resulted from weak hips and other leg muscles that are being strengthened in this program.  How motivating! 

Throughout this phase, I have increased weight gradually when appropriate following this guideline – whenever a weight is ‘easy’ in two consecutive sessions, I will increase the weight for the next session by 10% or less.   I have increased the weight for some, not all, of the exercises balancing adding more weight and avoiding injury.

During this phase, I took a two-week break from the program because of illness, not injury.   I expect to resume the schedule within next week.  However, I expect to have lost some ground but also to regain it quickly.  Stay tuned for the next update.

 

Lessons from Strength Training for Triathletes

I have learned some important lessons while using this plan:

  1. Be patient – the results one should expect from this training, and all training may seem to come slowly.  Keep at it and you will eventually see results.
  2. Become familiar with the specific equipment you will use in the program.  I did not seek an introduction from a trainer and found that I was learning how to adjust it by observing others, experimenting.  I learned some things by accident, like how to add weight in 5 lb. increments on the machines.
  3. Add weight when after a few sessions (minimum of two) the weight seems easy.  You can tell that it is easy when you can maintain good form throughout all the repetitions.

Interested in Joining Me?

If you would like to join me in following Mark Allen’s strength training program for triathletes, comment below or email me at seniortriathletes@gmail,com.  I will share the Google Sheet with you so you can record your results and we can track our progress.

 

New to Strength Training?

You may be interested in this article from Silver Sneakers with advice on how to begin a strength training program.

 

To Be Continued . . .

This post was first published on March 14, 2019.  The latest update was published on August 13, 2019.

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How Seniors Can Prepare for their First Triathlon

How Seniors Can Prepare for their First Triathlon
Photo by Tomasz Woźniak on Unsplash

By Laurie Larson, Contributor

Triathletes of any age who are motivated and self-disciplined can safely and effectively train for a triathlon. Remember that a triathlon is not so much a sport for only the elite, but really it is a hobby that people work into their everyday lives, much like work, family, and routine duties.

According to the New York Times, there is a growing number of seniors involved with triathlons, and the Center for Disease and Control encourages older athletes to join in competitive sports. In fact, membership of USA Triathlon by older athletes has gone up by 230 percent since 2005!

 

Getting Started

So what age defines an “older” athlete? By most accounts, athletes over 50 are considered older, but that in no way means fitness and performance decrease as you age. To the contrary, you can perform well and continue to improve as an athlete every increasing year and decade of your life. If you are new to all three components of a triathlon, preliminary starter tips regardless of decade include:

  • If you are new to swimming, biking, and running, choose just one to work on at a time and utilize beginner training plans, building up slowly over time.
  • Look for local races and consider volunteering, where you can chat with people for knowledge and details about triathlons, as well as gain insider tips.
  • Join a triathlete training program where you can make some friends and be encouraged to be persistent with accomplishing small, manageable goals.

According to Ironman Coach Sally Drake, the limits you may experience with age include muscle loss, slower metabolism, loss in bone density, weaker immune system, and loss of joint range of motion. In order to account for such limitations, Drake says you must recognize the signs that you need to slow down or take more rest, especially if you feel pain.

See testimonials of triathletes over 50 and see Ironman training plans for triathletes who are 55+.

In terms of your 50s and then 60s and beyond, remembering specific guidelines and training recommendations per your decade will help you perform well and reduce the chance of injury:

 

Training in Your 50s

According to 220 Triathlon, your joints begin to stiffen as your cartilage thins and the amount of lubricant surrounding your joints decreases. To combat this factor, choose to run on alternate days with interval sessions just once a week, in order to go easy on your joints and maximize performance. 220 Triathlon recommends a 2:1 training approach where you work hard for two weeks and rest for one week, and during that week of rest and recovery, engage in stretching, yoga, and massage. You want to reduce risks involved with overtraining and burning yourself out.

 

Training in Your 60s and Beyond

As you age, your muscle mass decreases. Remember that as you age, strength training is more and more critical, as by the time you turn 70, 24 percent of muscle mass is lost, where strength training increases these muscle building hormones. Restoration through sleep becomes more and more important, and napping can be very effective as well.

According to 220 Triathlon, better sleep and napping improve alertness, enhance performance, and reduce mistakes. Napping over 40 minutes increases release of the testosterone and growth hormone that helps repair and build muscle. It’s critical that your time of sleep is conducive of restoration, so be sure you can stay comfortable and avoid exacerbating your pain through sleeping on an improper sleeping structure. While your sleep is an important part of your rest and recovery, taking breaks is as well. Make sure you’re properly scheduling workouts and take two days of rest between your trainings.

 

Consulting with Your Doctor

As with any matter concerning your health, it’s important that you consult with your doctor when making any major lifestyle changes. Once you decide to start training for a triathlon, it’s wise to visit with your doctor before, during, and after to be sure you are staying safe and healthy. Your doctor may be able to advise you on specific stretches, limits, and medications that could help you along the way. It’s always better to be safe than sorry, so keeping your doctor involved in the process is the best way to train.

It turns out that age truly is just a number, provided that you account for changes in your body over time. Whether you are an aspiring athlete or someone who has been at this for a lifetime, with a proper training plan, diet, and persistence, the sky’s the limit!

 

Laurie Larson is a freelance writer based out of NC. She enjoys writing on health and lifestyle topics to help others live their best, healthiest, and happiest life!

 

You may also be interested in these posts

 

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Triathlon Across the USA: State #25 – Oregon

Triathlon Across the USA: State #25 – Oregon
Weddle Covered Bridge in Sweet Home, Oregon

Sweet Home, Oregon, September 12, 2015 – Lewis Creek County Park, Foster Lake

The Oregon triathlon was the second of three sprint triathlons I would complete in seven days.  The first of the three, the South Davis Recreation Center Labor Day Triathlon in Bountiful, Utah, was finished.  The third was the Tri Turtle Tri in Bremerton, Washington set for the next day.

 

Sightseeing Before the Oregon Triathlon

With four days between arriving in Oregon and the next triathlon, Joy and I toured the western part of the state, beginning in Crater Lake National Park.  After the better part of a day of stopping for pictures and to read information displays at numerous locations around the crater, we headed toward the southern end of Oregon.

The route we chose led us into the northwest corner of California where we connected to Highway 101, also named the Oregon Coast Highway once we re-entered Oregon.

During the next three days, we made our way along the entire length of the Oregon coast, passing for a short time into the southern end of Washington state.

 

A Leisurely Trip Up the Coast

We had no schedule beyond the need to arrive in Sweet Home on Friday afternoon.  So, we took our time, stopping and lingering at places that caught our attention, like Lincoln City where we learned about crabbing (see photo collage below).

Crater Lake - Lincoln City Oregon - Cape Meares lighthouse - Arches Rock

Crater Lake (upper left); Joy receiving instruction on trapping crab (upper right); Top of the Cape Meares lighthouse (lower right); Oregon coast at Arches Rock (lower left).

 

Great Seafood

Both of us experienced more than a few jaw-dropping moments while taking in the beauty and diversity of the inland and coastal landscapes.

For lunches and dinners, we took advantage of our proximity to the Pacific Ocean to partake of the local seafood.

The most memorable of these meals was during our overnight stop in Florence.  It was at the Waterfront Depot Restaurant that we enjoyed the most scrumptious halibut, a crab encrusted fillet with a sweet chili sauce, that either of us has had, even to this day.

By Friday afternoon, we arrived, as planned, into Linn County, the “Grass Seed Capital of the World”, and Sweet Home, the host city for the Oregon triathlon.

 

Free Camping

While registering for the race, I noticed that the call for race volunteers came with the offer of free camping within Lewis Creek County Park.   Joy and I decided that she would volunteer for the race, in part so we could take advantage of this offer.

We had purchased a two-person tent intending to camp at the park on Friday night.  Camping offered two benefits.  First, it would save the cost of a hotel.  However, second, and even more importantly, it would avoid us having to rise before dawn to get to the race site around the time of the opening of the transition area.

However, it became clear that camping was no longer our first choice for the evening once we arrived at Lewis Park for packet pickup on Friday afternoon.

Sure, the park was gorgeous, and it had all the essential facilities.  However, temperatures in the high 80°F and unseasonably high humidity made the thought of camping completely unappealing.  We had both become too accustomed to climate control, not to mention mattresses, for a good night’s rest while in a tent in these conditions.

One of the volunteers at packet pickup told us that the hotels within Sweet Home were fully booked for the weekend.  However, thanks to a last-minute cancellation, we were blessed with the availability of a clean, air-conditioned motel room.

Triathlon tip: Some have called triathlon ‘a rich man’s sport’ because of the cost of equipment, nutrition, registration, travel to the event, and more.  However, there are several ways to minimize the costs, such as camping at the race venue when available and using the suggestions in this post from Training Peaks.

 

5th Best in the West Triathlon Festival

Headquarters for the Best in the West Triathlon Festival was Lewis Creek County Park, in Willamette Valley a few miles east of Sweet Home.  The park is home to Foster Lake, a reservoir created by a dam along the South Santiam River.

The Best in the West Triathlon Festival, managed by Best in the West Events, was a two-day affair.  Saturday included sprint and half Ironman distances of the triathlon and duathlon races.  In addition, each of these included relay versions in which two or three participants shared a leg of the race.

Distances for the individual legs of the USAT-sanctioned sprint triathlon in which I took part were:

  • Swim: 0.3 miles (500 m)
  • Bike: 12 miles (19.5 km)
  • Run: 3.1 miles (5 km)

On Sunday, college men and women competed in the Olympic distance race.  Others, called ‘age groupers’, raced in Olympic distance triathlon and duathlon events as individuals or as part of men’s, women’s, or coed relay teams.

Sunday also included events for children and those wanting to “test the water” with triathlon.  Kids competed in either a short or long course swim and run.  There was also a ‘Try-a-Tri’ distance for both children and adults.  For this event, the distances for each of the three sports was roughly half those for the sprint triathlon.

More information about the various races is on the event website.

Saturday’s event began with the half Ironman triathlon swim.  Sprint distance racers started once all the half Ironman racers had finished the swim and were on their bikes.

 

Swim

While the air temperatures were warm, the water temperature was below 78⁰F making the race ‘wetsuit-legal’ according to USAT rules.

Before the start, we waded into Foster Lake to about chest depth.  Here we waited for the start signal which, for this race, was produced by a real shotgun.

Best in the West Triathlon swim start at Foster Lake Oregon. (Picture courtesy of Best in the West Events.)

The Best in the West triathlon open water swim took place in Foster Lake.  Swimmers took off with a real shotgun start. (Picture courtesy of Best in the West Events.)

 

With the shotgun blast, we swam away from the beach toward the first orange buoy (visible above the horse’s neck in the above picture).

At the orange buoy, we turned left and swam to a second turn buoy.  At this second buoy, we made a second left turn and swam back to the beach.  Upon reaching the beach, we jogged into the transition area.

 

Bike

The flat bike course ran along the northern edge of Foster Lake following North River Road.

After 2-1/2 miles, we reached the end of the lake; the end containing Foster Dam and a small hill that drops about 100 ft (30 m) over a quarter of a mile.  The course continued about 3-1/2 miles to the turnaround on a residential street in the northwest corner of Sweet Home.

From here, we rode back along the same route as we had just covered.  This time, we climbed up the hill at the dam.

Bike course for Best in the West triathlon on North River Road at Foster Lake Oregon

A portion of the bike course for the Best in the West Oregon Triathlon was on the road that runs along the north side of Foster Lake. (Picture courtesy of Best in the West Events.)

 

Run

The run course covered a short distance of grass and a wooden footbridge.  Other than those, the run was on paved roads and trails within the park.  The gradual rolling hills with climbs of 50 to 70 feet (15 to 21 m) provided enough challenge to make the race interesting.

However, the shade and overall beauty of the tree-lined paths made for a pleasant finish to the triathlon.

Best in the West triathlon run course in Lewis Creek County Park Oregon

The run course for the Best in the West sprint triathlon was nearly completely covered. (Picture courtesy of Best in the West Events.)

 

Awards Ceremony for the Oregon Triathlon

I finished last of those in my age group (males age 60-64).   However, for this race, it was also a third place finish which qualified me for one of the awards given to the top three finishers in each age group.

The award (pictured below) was among the most unique I have received to date.  You can see other novel awards at “5 Unique Triathlon Medals; They are No Longer Just Metal”.

Age group award from the Best of the West sprint triathlon.

Age group award from the Best of the West sprint triathlon.

 

After the Race

Following the race, we rushed back to the motel for a shower before returning to the park for the awards ceremony.

It was then back on the road to make the five-hour drive to Bremerton, Washington.  Our goal was to reach there in the late afternoon in time for packet pickup for the next day’s triathlon.  Spoiler alert: we made it in time.

 

Race First’s

  • First triathlon with a “shotgun start” involving a shotgun.

 

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My Favorite Triathlon Websites

My Favorite Triathlon Websites
Running in the USA Home Page

The internet abounds with information about training, preparing, and planning for a triathlon.  Through my years taking part in the sport, I have come across many websites, among the best websites for triathletes, especially those age 50 and over.

As its title implies, this post includes information about the websites I have found to be the ‘go-to’ sites for my triathlon journey.

Favorite Websites for:

 

Best Website for Planning Your Next Triathlon

RunningintheUSA.com is my first choice when searching for triathlons across the USA.

running-in-the-usa-dot-com is the best-website-for-triathletes-looking-for-their-next-triathlon

Running in the USA Multisport Events menu

Why I Started Using It

As soon as Joy and I decided to do triathlons in each of the states of the USA, I started searching the internet for websites that listed various races.  I found several sites, some with a regional focus.  Over time, I found that I relied more and more on Running in the USA.

 

Who is Behind the Website?

RunningintheUSA.com is the product of hard work and commitment of the husband and wife team of Bill and Mary Flaws of Waukesha, Wisconsin.  According to the website:

“Mary is an avid runner, and Bill is sane. Mary does the website programming. Bill takes the pictures that are featured on the home page. We work many many many many hours scouring the internet, maintaining the information in the directories. This is our full-time life work. We don’t have other jobs. We barely do much else besides maintain this website. It is our life, and we love it.”

Video Demo of RunningintheUSA.com

Key Features

The site can currently be used to search a database of over 41,000 running races such as 5k, 10k, half marathon, and so on and over 2,700 multisport events like triathlons.

  • Search for triathlons by
    • Region
    • State
    • Type of multisport event (e.g. Triathlon, Duathlon, Aquathon)
    • Distance (e.g. Supersprint, Sprint, Olympic, Half Ironman, Ironman)
    • Date (e.g. month, date range)
  • Search for races in adjacent states on consecutive dates

Apparently, there is an important population of those who share an interest in completing races in multiple states.  For this group, the site developers included a feature under the Multisport Events tab called ‘Double Stater’.

double-stater-menu

The “Double Stater” menu is used to search for triathlons held on consecutive days in adjacent states.

Other Sites for Finding Upcoming Triathlons

This review was first published in January 2019.

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Best Website about Sleep and Your Athletic Performance

Whether you are stepping up to the plate at a softball game or waiting for the starting gun at your next triathlon, the quality of the sleep you have had will affect your performance.

And as a triathlete, sleep will have played a critical part in your training.  As I have noted in the post titled ‘Rest and Recovery – Why It’s Important for Senior Triathletes, sleep should be a key part of your training plan.

Tuck.com is a valuable website for those who are looking for better sleep or have questions about getting the rest needed for proper recovery. If you are someone who is passionate about health and fitness and are looking to start a blog of your own, but want to improve your social media accounts (Instagram for example) first, finding ways to get followers on instagram could be a good place to start. Following this, you can then start thinking about creating a blog which can give people advice when it comes to health and fitness.

Video Tour of Tuck.com

 

Pages Highlighted in the Video Tour

Pages of the Tuck.com website highlighted in the video review are:

Please check out Tuck.com and share your comments below.

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Best Website for Swim and Other Triathlon Training Gear

Triathlon is sometimes referred to as a rich man’s sport.  This comes in part from the expense of registration fees, even though there are race organizations who are offering reduced fees.  But that’s a story for another time.

Another reason that triathlon can be an expensive sport is the amount of clothing and equipment one can purchase for training and racing in three, quite different sports.  Of course, much of it is unnecessary, especially if you belong to a full gym with a pool.

Meet SwimOutlet.com

SwimOutlet.com is the first place I go when looking for a new or replacement item for triathlon training or racing.  This is also where my wife, kids, and grandkids go for their swim clothing and equipment.  This comes from several years of shopping many sites and ending up purchasing items from the Swim Outlet site.

page on the SwimOutlet.com website for triathlon gear, one of the best websites for triathlon

SwimOutlet is a USA Triathlon certified multisport retailer.

While you should shop around, I have consistently found Swim Outlet to offer a full range of products in a range of quality and price points.  And, prices are competitive and, many times, the lowest.   Plus, they offer a price match.

Following is a quick tour of the SwimOutlet website.

If you prefer, you can watch the video on YouTube.

Video Script

Here we are at SwimOutlet.com website.  To help you get started on your journey here, I want to highlight a few areas in which triathletes may be most interested.

First of all, at the ‘Gear’ then ‘Swim Gear’ tab, you can find everything imaginable for swimming no matter if you are a beginner or professional triathlete.  With so many products to choose from, Swim Outlet helps shoppers zero-in on the right ones using product-specific filters such a size, brand, color, material, and price.

The site also includes several guides such as the one for sun protection shown here.  You can find the link to this and other pages in the SeniorTriathletes.com post about my favorite triathlon websites (this post for those watching the video on SeniorTriathletes.com).

The ‘Triathlon’ link beneath the ‘Gear by Sport’ area under the ‘Gear’ tab, takes you to pages where you can find triathlon, biking, and running specific items.  By the way, Swim Outlet is a USA Triathlon certified multisport retailer.

And if you are a Value shopper looking for the best deals, click on the SALE tab from the Home page.  Here you will find good quality at the most competitive prices.  For example, if you are looking for low cost jammers for your swim training, check out their grab bags by typing ‘grab’ in the search bar.

Take a stroll through the SwimOutlet site.  I think you will enjoy it and be amazed at the wide range of products and their good prices.

Thank you for watching.

END OF VIDEO SCRIPT

Featured SwimOutlet Pages

Pages of the SwimOutlet website highlighted in the video review are:

Disclosure: Please note that SeniorTriathletes.com is a participant in the SwimOutlet.com affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to SwimOutlet.com.  As an affiliate, I will receive a small commission for any purchases made at SwimOutlet.com when you use the link in this post.

Sales are common on SwimOutlet.com

SwimOutlet.com offers quality products at competitive prices.

Please check out SwimOutlet.com and share your comments below.

This review was first published in May 2019.

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Best Website for Nutrition and Hydration

If you have done a triathlon, there is a good chance you are already familiar with Hammer Nutrition since they sponsor many triathlons and endurance sporting events.  In fact, you likely received in your swag-bag a sample of a Hammer Nutrition product – a Hammer Gel, Endurolytes Fizz, or one of their Energy bars.

Hammer Nutrition home page

I was introduced to more of the Hammer Nutrition products and how to use them by Senior Triathlete James Chapman at the Rocky Gap Triathlon in Maryland.

Then, when training for my first half marathon, I exchanged emails with Steve Born.  Steve laid out a fueling plan for both my training and the race itself.  Without the right fuel, an otherwise enjoyable challenge can become a disaster.  I don’t go out on a long bike ride without a few Hammers gels – just in case.

Since I sweat a lot during exercising of every kind, Hammer Endurolytes capsules are also great for maintaining electrolyte levels.

You can take a quick tour of the Hammer Nutrition website by clicking on the frame below.

Video Review of the Hammer Nutrition website

If you prefer, you can watch the video on YouTube

Video Script

I am on the Hammer Nutrition website. You can see its contents by hovering over the four top-level headings – Top Sellers, Fuels & Supplements, And More, and Education.

Hovering over ‘Fuels & Supplements’ shows you the range of products for training and racing and for daily consumption.  You can explore these further by clicking on one of the red sub-heads.

The ‘And More’ shows you ‘Gear’, including Clearance items and Electro Stimulation products which I have used and really enjoy. It also includes ‘Clothing’, ‘Coffee’ and ‘Body Care’ products with which I have less experience.

The fourth heading is ‘Education’ which contains a whole host of articles and quick-read advice pieces to help you learn about and fine-tune your fueling and hydration approaches for both training and racing.

As you can see, the site is easy to navigate.  I recommend taking at least a few minutes to take a look around it.  I am confident you will come away with some new and useful information.

Thank you for watching.

END

Featured Hammer Nutrition Pages

Pages of the Hammer Nutrition website highlighted in the video are:

If you want to receive a 15% discount on your first order with Hammer Nutrition, enter Customer Number 203519 when prompted. 

To be transparent, that Customer Number is assigned to me.  I will also receive a credit on my next order under the Hammer Nutrition Referral Program.  If you like, you can also participate in this program once you have become a customer.

Please check out Hammer Nutrition and share your comments below.

This review was first published in July 2019.

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Coming Soon: Favorite Websites for

  • Triathlon Training
    • Swim
    • Bike
    • Run
  • Racing Advice
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